Top 10 Strategies To Build Relationships With Middle School Students

Building relationships with students is probably the most important aspect of a teacher’s job! There are lots of theories out there as to why relationships in the classroom matter so much, but as a teacher, I know that strategies you can actually implement are more useful than theories (although if you are interested in the research behind them, leave a comment below and I will contact you!)

So, are you ready to jump in?

Seriously…you can start building relationships with your students tomorrow! This free strategy guide is a great resource to help you get started.


Check out these top 10 strategies for teachers to build relationships with students – 

  1. Pronounce their names correctly. 
  2. Establish time for them to share their interests and opinions.
  3. Learn about their interests and family circumstances. 
  4. Share information about yourself (keep it professional, of course!) 
  5. Model identification of and healthy ways to deal with emotions. 
  6. Give them (low stakes) choices. 
  7. Validate their feelings. 
  8. Involve them in establishing classroom procedures. 
  9. Clear and consistent consequences
  10. Remember, they are still children. Even if they don’t think so.

To get more details and ideas on how to implement these strategies, download the free guide!

Relationship building is an integral part of creating classroom community and classroom culture. When you dedicate time to building relationships with students, it makes teaching and learning easier! 

Plus, it doesn’t have to take up a ton of time. Try dedicating 5-10 minutes a day to the strategies listed above and soon you will see a difference in your classroom culture. 

The minutes you dedicate to this will be easily made up later when you don’t have to spend as much time redirecting the behavior of disconnected students.

So, go…take the step to improve your classroom culture today and get this free strategy list sent directly to your mailbox!

Top 10 strategies to build relationships with middle school students